autumn recipes: slow cooker super soup and maple pull-apart scones

slow cooker super soup (gen)

To be honest, I’ve been using my crockpot less often these days since I’ve discovered the depth of flavor I can get from my Dutch oven. But some days are absolutely slow cooker days- any day that I need to tackle a mountain of laundry, for example. 

This is one of my favorite slow cooker meals, because it uses up leftovers and tastes great but a little different every time, depending on what I have on hand. It’s my husband’s favorite vegetarian soup- so much so that he started calling it “super soup.” Essentially, it’s the love child of a traditional pasta e fagioli and an adaptation of this recipe.

Ingredients: 

The only essential ingredients in this soup, in my opinion, are the Parmesan rind, the garlic, and the tomatoes. Everything else can be swapped out or omitted if necessary. Use whatever vegetables are in your fridge and legumes/grains are in your pantry. 

  • Parmesan rind (that hardened, leftover piece of the cheese you’d normally just toss)

  • 1 can of diced tomatoes (or one cup of fresh)

  • 3-5 freshly minced garlic cloves

  • 1 onion, diced

  • 1 can of chickpeas (or about two cups dried chickpeas) - feel free to swap out for your legume of choice

  • 4-5 cups of chicken stock (vegetable stock works too)

  • A green bell pepper, diced

  • A couple of celery stalks, diced

  • A couple of carrot sticks, diced

  • A couple of bay leaves

  • Salt and lots of pepper to taste (add in your other favorite seasonings as desired, such as red pepper flakes)

Instructions:

  1. Add all ingredients to slow cooker and cook on a low setting for 6-8 hours. 

  2. If you’re using dried legumes, you’ll need at least 8 hours on the low setting. Otherwise, 6 hours on low setting will suffice. You’ll know the soup is done when your legumes are soft but not mushy, and your cheese rind is soft and broken down.

    Optional: I usually add in some ditalini pasta about 15 minutes before I’m ready to serve. You could also add in some greens, such as spinach, about 10 minutes prior to serving, just long enough for them to soften. Garnish with chopped parsley. Adding a little grated Parmesan to the top of your soup brings this to another level. 

So do you eat the rind? I don’t, but that’s my husband’s favorite part. Taste a little and if you don’t like it, toss it out with your bay leaves.


autumn maple pull-apart scones (kat)

(recipe taken from Land O Lakes Recipe Collection:  Baking and More and adapted to be a bit healthier)

Ingredients:

Scones:

  • 2 c white whole wheat flour (or all purpose flour)

  • 1/3 c brown sugar

  • 1.5 tsp baking soda

  • 1/4 tsp salt

  • 6 tbsp coconut oil (or butter), cold

  • 3/4 c chopped pecans

  • 3/4 c whipping cream

  • 2 egg yolks

  • 1 tsp maple syrup

  • 1/4 c raw sugar

Maple glaze:

  • 3/4 c powdered sugar

  • 1 tsp maple syrup

  • 2-3 tsp almond milk (or regular milk)

Instructions:

  1. Heat oven to 400 degrees F.  Line or grease standard size muffin tins.  I find that greasing them works better for this recipe.

  2. Combine dry scone ingredients (except for sugar) in a large bowl.

  3. Cut coconut oil into dry ingredients.

  4. Fold in pecans.

  5. Combine whipping cream, egg yolks, and 1 tsp maple syrup in small bowl; beat well.  

  6. Pour wet mixture over dry ingredients and stir until dough is moist.

  7. Knead a few times on a lightly floured surface.

  8. Divide dough into 48 balls. (It helps to divide dough in half, making 24 balls out of each big mass of dough).

  9. Roll the divided dough in the sugar and put three small balls of dough in each muffin cup. 

  10. Top each muffin cup with one more ball of dough.  (Scones should have four small balls of dough.)

  11. Bake for 16-18 minutes or until lightly browned.  Cool in pan for a few minutes, then place on cooling rack.

  12. Combine glaze ingredients, and drizzle over the warm scones.

Miriam takes her role of helping me stir very seriously.

Miriam takes her role of helping me stir very seriously.

This is what your dough should look like once the coconut oil is cut into the flour mixture.

This is what your dough should look like once the coconut oil is cut into the flour mixture.

Here are the size of the dough balls to be put in each muffin cup.

Here are the size of the dough balls to be put in each muffin cup.

Before baking, this is what your scones should look like.

Before baking, this is what your scones should look like.

After glazing, your scones are ready to be devoured and crumbled on top of your newborn-in-a-wrap’s head!

After glazing, your scones are ready to be devoured and crumbled on top of your newborn-in-a-wrap’s head!